Repentance

Description

Repentance comes full circle when we’re actually obeying God from our hearts. We're obeying Him because we want to.

Psalm 51

Repentance, by definition, is to simply “turn around.” But when it comes to sinful habits, it’s significantly easier to say than it is to do—especially those habits and patterns we’ve developed over the years.

When we realize we’re walking down a path contrary to God’s desire for our lives, he wants us to “turn around” and starting walking after him. King David, in Psalm 51, gives us an excellent example of what repentance looks like. David had just committed some major moral mistakes and his prayer of repentance gives us insight on what real repentance involves.

Repentance can be broken down into three C’s: contrition, confession, and change. True repentance starts with contrition—a broken heart over sinning against God. Then we must confess to God our error. The truth is, he already knows; but there’s power in verbalizing and owning our fault before God. It frees us from the power of secrecy. Finally, we must change our actions and begin to obey.

Repentance comes full circle when we’re actually obeying God from our hearts: obeying him because we want to.

Today, memorize Psalm 51.17 which talks about the beginning of repentance: having a broken and contrite heart. Ask God to break your heart for the things that break his as you daily turn back to him and away from sin.

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