Love Is Not Rude

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A person who is habitually rude drives away other people, so learn to replace rudeness with love.

Love is not rude. 1 Corinthians 13:5

Love rejects rudeness because rudeness is reserved for the insensitive and the insecure. Rudeness is impolite and disrespectful. Indeed, a rude reply stands ready on the lips of an unlovely life. Rude people use coarse words that rub their listeners the wrong way. They pride themselves in being without airs, but they are insensitive in the timing and tone of their conversations. They hurt feelings at the drop of a hat and seem to alienate people on purpose. However, love is the light that leads rudeness out of darkness (Romans 2:19).

A rude person is a rascal to work alongside because you never know when they are going to offend you or someone else. You lose confidence in rude people because of their volatile nature. You don’t want to be embarrassed around one of their outbursts or social indiscretions, so you shun their presence. Rude people become loners by default. Over time, no one can tolerate a barrage of irreverence and sarcasm. Even the most accepting and forgiving saints grow weary of rudeness. Indeed, rudeness has no place in a caring culture.

Love expunges rudeness like a healthy body does a virus. It uses tough love to escort rudeness out the door of a relationship. Because you love them and those they influence, you need to be very direct and matter-of-fact in your communication with a rude person. Direct conversation is the only way they begin to “get it.” Love takes the time to be very candid and clear with rude people who tend to run roughshod over others. However, be careful not to be rude in dealing with the rude. Do not lower your standards to theirs. Be prayed up and filled up with the Spirit before you encounter the rude with truth (Romans 9:1).

Without being patronizing, love is able to find at least one admirable quality in someone else. Even if a rude person is full of himself, some redeeming quality lies dormant. Love is able to extract the potential for goodness deep within a selfish soul in the same way that Barnabas saw possibilities in Saul (Acts 9:27). Love looks beyond the hard, crusty exterior of someone’s character and understands that fear may have locked his or her love into solitary confinement. The person may feel lost, lonely and afraid. Nevertheless, love is able to get past this rude roadblock and inject faith. Faith in God, faith in oneself, and faith in others frees one from rudeness.

The Almighty’s rude awakening transforms an impolite heart into one full of kindness and grace. When love has its way, rudeness runs away. Love those who are rude and watch what God can do. Their sarcasm is a smokescreen that hides a lonely, loveless and hurt heart. Rude people are reaching out but they don’t know how. Stay committed to your rude roommate, relative, parent, child or colleague. Love them to Jesus, and your unconditional love will melt away their iceberg-like insecurities. Pray they will see themselves as Christ sees them, and pray they will love and be loved. Love loves the rude but is not rude. Therefore, be persistent by staying engaged in unconditional love. Watch the rude walls come down as you bombard them with consistent acts of love.

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