Jesus Christ: Exalted Like No Other

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Jesus has been exalted and received a name above every name. When we accept that fact that Jesus’ exaltation was on our behalf, it will increase our faith, strengthen our hope, and revolutionize our lives.

At Jesus’ exaltation, His eternal glory was restored. Despite artistic representations to the contrary, Jesus was not born with a halo. Jesus did not live His earthly life bearing a glow of the next world. His countrymen asked, “Is this not the Son of Mary?” When Judas betrayed Jesus, he did so with a kiss. He didn’t tell the officers, “Just arrest the glowing guy.” The only glimpse of Christ’s glory seen on earth was on the Mount of Transfiguration, which was so astounding, Peter wanted to build tabernacles on the spot.

In John 17:4-5 Jesus prayed, “I have glorified You on the earth by completing the work You gave Me to do. Now, Father, glorify Me in Your presence with that glory I had with You before the world existed” (HCSB). Part of Jesus’ exaltation was the restoration of His glory. The glory He set aside for the incarnation was restored at His exaltation.

Returning King of Glory

After His resurrection, Jesus saw Mary Magdalene in the garden where His former tomb was located. He instructed her to stop clinging to Him, because He had “not yet ascended” to the Father. Although the full meaning of this particular passage is not agreed upon, Jesus clearly intended to return to His Father and receive His exaltation!

At His exaltation, His position is established. One of David’s psalms is a song for a victorious king. The song and refrain goes like this:

“Lift up your heads, you gates!
Rise up, ancient doors!
Then the King of glory will come in.
Who is this King of glory?
The LORD, strong and mighty,
The LORD, mighty in battle.
Lift up your heads, you gates!
Rise up, ancient doors!
Then the King of glory will come in.
Who is He, this King of glory?
The LORD of Hosts,
He is the King of glory.”1

One possible context for this psalm is the return of the Ark of the Covenant to the tabernacle or the temple. The Ark represented the presence and power of God. The call and response focused praise on the God of Israel, strong, mighty, and glorious. Some Bible scholars believe that this psalm is a prophetic poem referring to Jesus. If so, the scene is the return of Christ to heaven at His ascension. He is the returning King of Glory!

Everything You Need for Victorious Living is in Jesus

Jesus Christ has been exalted like no other, but His exaltation is not without meaning for us today. Tony Evans writes in Bible Studies for Life, “In Jesus, the One who stands exalted like no other, you will discover both the fullness and the summation of everything you’ll ever need in heaven and on earth. It’s all there–in Him. Everything you need for victorious living is in Jesus.”2

He has been exalted and received a name above every name. At the name of Jesus, every knee will bow in the entire universe–heaven and earth–and the tongue of every person will confess that Jesus Christ is Lord of all.3 When we accept that fact that Jesus’ exaltation was on our behalf, it will increase our faith, strengthen our hope, and revolutionize our lives.

 

1– Psalm 24:7-10 (HCSB)
2– Bible Studies for Life, Like No Other, Tony Evans
3– Philippians 2, paraphrase

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