Forgiven

Description

Allow the Holy Spirit to examine your relationships. Is there anyone you have a simmering resentment towards?

Pray: 

My Lord and my God, to You I lift my voice in praise. I pray for wisdom which gives me new insights into Your Word.

Read: 

Matthew 18:21-35

Meditate

Consider:  "And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors" (Matt. 6:12).

Think Further: 

Peter, prompted perhaps by Jesus' previous words (15), asks how few times God expects him to forgive and seems to think he is being generous (21). The rabbis suggested that three times was enough! Does our own forgiveness ever hide a sense of self-righteousness? Is it the real thing or do we guard deep-seated resentment? The "seventy times seven" (22, KJV) implied a continuous, infinite stream of forgiveness--just as God forgives us.

This masterful kingdom parable (23-34) would have shocked, engaged and surprised Jesus' listeners--and made them smile. What the servant owed (24) was beyond imagination: think national debt rather than winning the lottery! The master knows the servant's promise to pay him back means nothing--and he cancels the debt. Of course, we hear the message--God forgives our debt too--but there's more: a right response to God's forgiveness transforms our attitudes and actions. However, unlike the king, the forgiven servant offers no way out to his debtor (30). The servant's harsh treatment of his fellow laborer--for a relatively small amount--reveals an unchanged, self-centered spirit. The servant's lack of forgiveness brings the inevitable consequences of its own imprisonment and torture (34).

As the story progresses, our sympathies are first engaged with the underdog, then we are horrified by his actions. Finally, to our surprise, comes the realization that we are this man (35). We might not act on it, but does our simmering resentment leave our brother despised in our imagination? That's not the liberating forgiveness of God. Jesus asks us to "forgive ... from your heart" (35). "I will ... remember their sins no more" (Jer. 31:34), says our King. Let's offer this joyful, generous gift of forgiveness and forgetfulness to one another. It's not only our own lives that will be transformed.

Apply:  Allow the Holy Spirit to examine your relationships. See if there is anyone you have simmering resentment towards, someone you despise in your imagination. You know what to do about that!

Pray: 

Forgiving Lord, I am forever grateful that You forgive me. I need special grace to truly forgive others. I ask for Your power to be made perfect in my weakness.

Please register for a free account to view this content

We hope you have enjoyed the 10 discipleship resources you have read in the last 30 days.
You have exceeded your 10 piece content limit.
Create a free account today to keep fueling your spiritual journey!

Already a member? Login to iDisciple

Related
Forgiveness—An Act of Worship
Anne Graham Lotz
The Many Masks of Anger
Dr. Michael Youssef
What Do You Do with Your Anger and Stress?
Bryant Wright
Choosing Love Over Rights
Dr. Charles Stanley
Seeing Past the Brokenness
First15
Follow Us

Want to access more exclusive iDisciple content?

Upgrade to a Giving Membership today!

Already a member? Login to iDisciple