Doing the Right Thing

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We don't know what would have happened to Lot and his family if Abraham had been fatalistic instead of faithful. But because Abraham knew that God would allow him to speak, Abraham brought his request to God.

Genesis 18:25  

True faith is a funny thing. On the surface, it can appear no different from true fatalism. Both the faithful and the fatalist believe that everything will “work out in the end.” True, something  always works out in the end. But the difference between the faithful and the fatalist is two-fold: one, the faithful believes that the end result can be influenced, and two, the faithful believes that the end achieved is the end decreed (that is, that there is Someone directing the end, making all things “work together for good”).

Take the story of Abraham in Genesis 18. God was about to bring judgement upon the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah for their terrible sins. Abraham was concerned for the lives of his nephew Lot and his family who lived in Sodom—perhaps ten people in all. He asked God whether he planned to sweep away the righteous (Lot and his family) along with the wicked. Would God spare 50 righteous? “Yes” was the answer. 45? Yes. 40? 30? 20? 10? Each time Abraham shrunk the circle, God stayed in it with him, agreeing to spare the city if there were as few as 10 righteous people in it. It is one of the most amazing “negotiations” between humanity and deity found in Scripture. And what was Abraham’s point of argument with God? That the Judge (or Ruler) of all the earth must do right. God apparently agreed with Abraham’s assessment. God is the judge of all the earth, and would do right by the ten righteous in the city.

We don’t know what would have happened to the city, and Lot’s family, if Abraham had been fatalistic instead of faithful. But because he knew God would allow him to speak, and that God’s answers are governed by his own righteous character (meaning the answer, whether Yes or No, would be the right answer), he brought his request to God.

Which are you—faithful or fatalistic? Faithfulness means that you will let your requests be made known to God, and then rest in his peace (Philippians 4:6-7) because God is the Judge of all the earth—and he always does what is right.

God’s Promise to You: “Whatever my answer, it is right.”

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