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An Intimate Union

Description

Clearly, God did not intend a Master-servant relationship as His final plan for His people. He wants pure, wedded bliss.

Prophetic voices and rabbinic teaching considered the Sinai event to be a betrothal ceremony between God and his people (see Jeremiah 2:2, for example). This theme of intimate union continued through the allegorical interpretation of Solomon’s Song, prophets like Jeremiah and Ezekiel, the parables of Jesus (the bridegroom, wedding banquets, etc.), and that wedding at the end of Revelation. Clearly, God did not intend a Master-servant relationship as His final plan for His people. He wants pure, wedded bliss.

That’s why the law of Moses is not the end of scripture. Good stories end with “happily ever after,” not betrothal contracts. God wants hearts that beat His rhythms, share His feelings, and hear His whispered longings. He wants a divine-human romance.

That may make some people uncomfortable, but it’s a solid theme in scripture. And it’s tragic that many people have turned this holy intimacy back into religious observance. Intimacy is personal — perhaps too personal for comfort. But God didn’t design us for perpetual comfort, did He? He designed us for perpetual joy. And sterile religious observance never reaches it.

If your experience with God is not deeply intimate, ask Him for change. Come close to Him in complete trust and pining love, and He will draw you near in holy passion. This is how your heart is fulfilled, if you’re willing. Embrace His overtures by letting His Spirit embrace you.

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