8 Actions to Consider When You Can’t Respect the Leader

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You can continue to grow, even with a leader you don't respect. Ron Edmondson shares eight actions to consider.

It’s not uncommon that I receive a message from a staff member of another church struggling with the current leadership. The question is usually how they can continue to be where they don’t support the vision and direction of the pastor. They want my advice on how to respond during this season of ministry.

This situation is obviously not unique to churches, but also happens frequently in other organizations. I don’t believe all hope is lost during times like this. An individual can continue to grow even with a leader he or she cannot respect — sometimes even more.

Here are 8 actions I suggest when you don’t respect the leader:

1. Talk to God – That’s an obvious answer from a pastor, but sometimes it’s the thing we do the least. We complain faster it seems — at least I do. Ask God to reveal to you His purposes for your life during this season. It could be He’s preparing you for something, stirring the nest so-to-speak, or that you are in a time of testing. Don’t assume God is absent during this time. I assure you He’s not asleep at the wheel and has a plan. The closer you are to Him during this time the sooner you’ll understand that plan.

2. Keep working – Most of us need a paycheck. Be grateful while you have one. Unless you know for certain you are to quit, it is destroying you or your family, or you sense something immoral is happening, there’s nothing wrong with working until you find something else.

3. Do your best – While you are there be above reproach in your work ethic. Make it your aim to prepare for your successor and to leave your area of responsibility better than you found it when you arrived.

4. Respect the leader – I know. That’s the tough one, but as long as you’re there you must respect authority. That’s our Biblical command. You may not respect them as a person but you can respect them as the boss.

5 .Learn all you can – The fact is we learn more during the stressful and difficult times, so be a sponge. You may gain all the wisdom of what not to do when you are in control, but you will learn something if you try.

6. Be thankful for the connections and experience – You will be gaining connections in the church (work) world — or at least you have that opportunity. It’s easier to network when you’re in the field than it is once you are no longer working. Be thankful for that opportunity.

7. Be a cheerleader for life – You may not enjoy your work setting but you can still be a positive life influence for those around you. Use your smile and your pleasant disposition as an encourager for others. You’ll feel better about yourself after you eventually leave.

8. Keep watching – Be open to what God will do next in your life. It may not be what you are expecting. Chances are good it will stretch you and require a leap of faith. Prepare your heart, family and attitude for that opportunity when it arrives.

Keep this in mind. I firmly believe we are called to a person — Jesus — more than any location. Even any other leader. At the end of the day, you’re biggest concern is to be faithful to your call — to Jesus.

Have you ever been in this position?



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